A Glimpse Into the Future of the Stock Market and Dollar | charles hugh smith

The “accident” many have been waiting for has finally happened, and it’s called Europe. That doesn’t bode well for the U.S. stock market.

A lot of technical analysts and financial pundits are expecting a standard-issue Santa Claus Rally once a “solution” to Europe’s debt crisis magically appears. There will be no such magical solution for the simple reason the problems are intrinsic to the euro, the Eurozone’s immense debts and the structure of the E.U. itself.

We can fruitfully start a speculative look into the future of the U.S. stock market and dollar with a quote from John Mauldin’s book Endgame: The End of the Debt Supercycle and How It Changes Everything:

Economic theory tells us that it is precisely the fickle nature of confidence, including its dependence on the public’s expectation of future events, which makes it so difficult to predict the timing of debt crises. High debt levels lead, in many mathematical economics models, to “multiple equilibria” in which the debt level might be sustained —or might not be.

Economists do not have a terribly good idea of what kinds of events shift confidence and of how to concretely assess confidence vulnerability. What one does see, again and again, in the history of financial crises is that when an accident is waiting to happen, it eventually does. When countries become too deeply indebted, they are headed for trouble. When debt-fueled asset price explosions seem too good to be true, they probably are. But the exact timing can be very difficult to guess, and a crisis that seems imminent can sometimes take years to ignite.

The accident has finally happened, and it’s called the euro/European debt crisis…

via charles hugh smith-A Glimpse Into the Future of the Stock Market and Dollar.

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