Can Police Search Your Cell Phone Without a Warrant? The Supreme Court is About to Decide | Liberty Blitzkrieg

Two very important cases related to the 4th Amendment protection of cellphone data went before the Supreme Court yesterday. At issue here is whether or not police can search someone’s cellphone upon arrest. As usual, the Obama administration’s Justice Department is arguing against the citizenry, and in favor of the (police) state. Let’s not forget that the “Justice” Department also argued in favor of the police being able to place GPS tracking devices on people’s cars without a warrant back in 2011. Fortunately, the Supreme Court ruled against it.

Naturally, the feds in the current case will discuss all of the criminals they were able to bring to justice as a result of these privacy violations, but they will certainly not point out America’s current epidemic of unlawful arrests, as well as arrests for petty non-violent crimes that happen each and every day. For instance, let’s not forget statistics that came out last fall from the FBI that showed police make an arrest every two seconds in the USA. I covered this in detail in my post: Land of the Free: American Police Make an Arrest Every 2 Seconds in 2012. Continue reading

Crime to Negligently Let Someone Stay in Your Home, Where You Have a Gun That the Visitor Knows About | Volokh Conspiracy

That seems to be the implication of United States v. Stegmeier (D.S.D. Dec. 2, 2011) (now on appeal). Stegmeier let a man named Kelley stay in his RV; Kelley was a fugitive from justice, and there was some evidence Stegmeier knew it. Stegmeier also told Kelley where Stegmeier kept his gun. When Kelley was caught, Stegmeier was prosecuted for various charges, including “dispos[ing]” a gun to “any person knowing or having reasonable cause to believe” the person is a felon, under indictment for a felony, or a fugitive from justice. Continue reading