Leftovers from Afghanistan and Iraq Wars: 1,558 Amputations; 7,224 Severe Brain Injuries; 118,829 Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders |AllGov

George W. Bush with Afghanistan War amputees Neil Duncan and Max Ramsey, July 24, 2006 (photo: Chris Kleponis, Pool, Getty Images)

The American toll from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan can be contemplated in many different ways, thanks to the Congressional Research Service (CRS).

A new CRS report (pdf) has provided a human accounting not only of how many service personnel died in the two conflicts, but of the many kinds of serious, life-long injuries with which thousands returned home.

A total of 1,558 soldiers endured major limb amputations as a result of battlefield injuries. Major limb amputations include the loss of one or more limbs, the loss of one or more partial limbs, or the loss of one or more full or partial hand or foot, according to the CRS.

Considerably more military personnel suffered “severe or penetrating brain injuries”— 7,224. Another 23,319 men and women were diagnosed with “moderate” brain injuries.

When “mild” and “not classifiable” cases are factored in, nearly 288,000 total brain injury cases were reported among all military personnel deployed and not deployed.

Then there are the post-traumatic stress disorder cases. The military and the Department of Veterans Affairs are currently trying to help 118,829 individuals who made it back with this mental disorder.

The CRS report also provided a demographic breakdown of those killed in Iraq and Afghanistan (so far).  The Iraq campaign resulted in 4,476 American deaths. Female personnel accounted for 110 of the fatalities; the rest were men. The vast majority of Iraq war deaths were Caucasian (3,697), followed by 444 blacks, 230 Hispanics, and 78 Asians.

In Afghanistan, there have been 2,299 military deaths as of January 6, of whom 49 were female. The ethnic composition is as follows: 1,953 whites, 188 blacks, 92 Hispanics, 63 Asians, and others.

via AllGov – News.

It Isn’t The Soda, And It Isn’t The Size | HealthNewsDigest.com

…The real driver of obesity in this nation is the volume of food available. As a nation we produce too much food and it’s cheap. Recently, food costs have risen, but we still spent less than 10% of our total income on food, down from 23% in the late 1920s.

If food were not so inexpensive there wouldn’t be a restaurant chain on every corner and there wouldn’t be 99 cent value meals. Because raw food costs are low, restaurants can offer more food at lower prices. We are enticed to super-size or buy a value meal, even when we don’t need all that extra food. We can get endless beverage refills, so we drink more. As a nation, we are super-sizing ourselves…via HealthNewsDigest.com.

Number of PhDs receiving federal aid more than tripled from 2007 to 2010 | Daily Caller

At some point, the question must be asked:  Is that useless degree worth it?? GE.

… According to The Chronicle of Higher Education, between 2007 and 2010, the percentage of people with a graduate degree who were on food stamps or were receiving another kind of federal aid more than doubled, reaching 360,000… In 2007, 9,776 people with PhD’s were receiving some kind of aid. In 2010, that number had more than tripled to 33,655. For people with master’s degrees, the number spiked from 101,683 to 293,029. Austin Nichols of the Urban Institute crunched those numbers for The Chronicle using census data…. via The Daily Caller.

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