Rogue cell towers discovered in Washington, D.C. | CSO Online

A simple drive with a CryptoPhone reveals fifteen new rogue sites, by Steve Ragan

Towards the end of July, ESD America, the makers of the ultra-secure CryptoPhone, said that their engineers and customers had discovered more than a dozen rogue cell towers (also known as interceptors or IMSI catchers) around the U.S.

New information shows that the discovered towers might only represent a small fraction of the whole, and what’s been discovered doesn’t account for the mobile base stations that are only active on a limited basis.

Interceptors are a huge risk if used by a malicious actor. That’s because once a device connects to them, the interceptor’s operator can perform a number of tasks, including eavesdrop on calls or text messages, or in some cases push data (spyware for example) to the device. This is why they’re only supposed to be used by law enforcement or the government.

However, that doesn’t mean that the government or law enforcement haven’t found themselves in the hot seat for abusing an interceptor’s functionality. The potential for abuse and wide availability of the technology, including home-grown versions that work just as well as their commercial counterparts, means that the existence of unknown interceptors are a major concern. Continue reading

Dropbox Reports 80 Percent of Subpoenas Contain Gag Request | Threatpost

Dropbox Reports 80 Percent of Subpoenas Contain Gag Request | Threatpost | The first stop for security news.

ACLU: Warrantless electronic surveillance surges under Obama | Digital Journal

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ACLU: Warrantless electronic surveillance surges under Obama.

NSA Whistleblowers Back EFF’s Lawsuit Over Government’s Massive Spying Program | RightSideNews

EFF Asks Court to Reject Stale State Secret Arguments So Case Can Proceed.

San Francisco – Three whistleblowers – all former employees of the National Security Agency (NSA) – have come forward to give evidence in the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s (EFF’s) lawsuit against the government’s illegal mass surveillance program, Jewel v. NSA.

 In a motion filed today, the three former intelligence analysts confirm that the NSA has, or is in the process of obtaining, the capability to seize and store most electronic communications passing through its U.S. intercept centers, such as the “secret room” at the AT&T facility in San Francisco first disclosed by retired AT&T technician Mark Klein in early 2006.

“For years, government lawyers have been arguing that our case is too secret for the courts to consider, despite the mounting confirmation of widespread mass illegal surveillance of ordinary people,” said EFF Legal Director Cindy Cohn. Continue reading