TSA: New regs say passengers cannot fly without biometric ID card | PSUSA

…. The ability to travel in the United States is about to become more restrictive as the TSA announces it will soon be enforcing new identification standards in American airports.

Beginning in 2016, passengers attempting to pass through a federal TSA checkpoint will be subject to the requirements of the REAL ID Act. To that end, the TSA will put higher scrutiny on travelers’ identities, and will only accept a federal passport or a “REAL-ID” card, which is issued by the states to meet federal requirements. Passengers will not be allowed to fly through an American airport without submitting to the advanced federal specifications.

Both federal passports and REAL-ID cards require a number of unique personal identifiers to be stored together in government databases, including his or her full name, date of birth, Social Security Number, scanned signature, and other identifiers. Both cards require biometric data: a front-facing digital photograph of the passenger’s face, which is ultimately used with a facial recognition database.

“It is a choice,” flippantly explained David Fierro, the Public Information Officer for the Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles. “If you use a passport when you’re traveling you don’t have any problems. If you use your driver’s license as identification, you’ll need to either apply for the Real ID card or get a passport.”

ORIGIN OF ‘REAL ID’  –  The enhanced security measures stem from the passage of the REAL ID Act of 2005, a U.S. law enacted by President Bush that states that a Federal agency may not accept state-issued identification cards without complying with a number of enhanced standards of the REAL ID Act.

The states were given a number of years to comply, and many moved to pass their own laws to meet the benchmarks of the REAL ID Act. Due to some sluggish response, DHS extended the compliance deadline several times.

Unfortunately, most states were all too willing to bend to the requirements of the federal government in order to obtain “state certifications” of compliance. To signify their compliance with the federal standards, many states are now issuing identity cards emblazoned with gold stars in the corner.

According to the Department of Homeland Security, only Arizona, Idaho, Louisiana, Maine, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New York, and American Samoa have not met REAL ID standards as of January 2015. By DHS estimates, 70%-80% of all U.S. drivers are already carrying around REAL ID cards or live in states that have received extensions for compliance.

Some states have even gone as far as to require the applicant to present birth certificates, W-2 tax forms, bank statements, and/or pay stubs to verify one’s identity before handing out the new REAL-ID cards. Some cards have RFID chips embedded in them.

Among the 39 benchmarks of the REAL ID Act, state ID cards have to be scannable with a bar code reader, and the states are required to share access to an electronic database with all other states.

Once DHS begins enforcing the REAL ID standards, Americans without a compliant state ID will be effectively prohibited from flying at a commercial airport. Passengers would need to obtain passports even to fly on planes that never leave the United States.

THE ILLUSION OF SECURITY go here–> Police State USA.

Brooklyn teen hospitalized with Ebola-like symptoms | NYPost

Brooklyn teen hospitalized w/ Ebola symptoms

A teen who had recently returned home to Brooklyn following a trip to Sudan was rushed to the hospital with Ebola-like symptoms on Friday night, authorities said.

The 14-year old boy fell unconscious with a fiery fever in the Bergen Beach apartment he shared with his family around 6:30 p.m. after a two-week trip to the Sudan in North Africa, officials said.

The teen was rushed to nearby Brookdale Hospital just before 7:30 p.m., when he was isolated and quarantined by hospital staff as doctors began tests to determine whether the teen has Ebola or not.

Sources told The Post the boy may have lied on a sheet all travelers are required to fill out following trips to infected regions.

The teen had not officially been diagnosed with Ebola as of Saturday morning.

The news comes on the heels of the death of Thomas Eric Duncan, a Liberian man who died from the virus days after returning to the US from Africa.