NJ: Michael Knight, 37, charged in brutal Rutgers-New Brunswick assault on female student surrenders

Michael P Knight
Michael P. Knight, 37 y.o., of Newark NJ

… Michael P. Knight of Newark has surrendered to police and been charged in a brutal attack of a college student has surrendered. Knight turned himself in on Friday night to face charges in the attack on Rutgers University’s New Brunswick campus this month.  Authorities say he struck the woman on the head, severely beat her and was attempting to sexually assault her when a group intervened around 3:30 a.m. on May 4.   Knight was described as being 6-feet, 2-inches, with shoulder-length dreadlocks and several tattoos. including a large “D” on his neck.

Michael P Knight 2
Mike Knight: A 6’2″ ladies man

The incident was reported to have occurred in the area of Van Dyke Hall on the College Avenue campus in New Brunswick, according to police . Knight followed the woman as she walked on the College Avenue campus on Wednesday, May 4 at 3:30 a.m.  He attacked her in the area of Van Dyke Hall, near College Avenue and Seminary Place … He struck her in the face, severely beat her, dragged her to the side of a building and was attempting to sexually assault her when a group of individuals intervened, prosecutors said. She had screamed out for help when she was first attacked, which alerted nearby witnesses. Knight fled on foot when the group intervened, running off towards Seminary Place. But as he ran, he said he had a gun and threatened to shoot one of the men who attempted to chase him.

He has been charged with aggravated assault, attempted aggravated sexual assault, kidnapping and other charges.  Knight was being held on $1 million bail and it wasn’t immediately known if he had a lawyer to comment on the charges. The woman was treated and released from a hospital.  Adapted from source: Michael Knight, 37, Charged In Brutal Rutgers Attack Surrenders

Can Police Search Your Cell Phone Without a Warrant? The Supreme Court is About to Decide | Liberty Blitzkrieg

Two very important cases related to the 4th Amendment protection of cellphone data went before the Supreme Court yesterday. At issue here is whether or not police can search someone’s cellphone upon arrest. As usual, the Obama administration’s Justice Department is arguing against the citizenry, and in favor of the (police) state. Let’s not forget that the “Justice” Department also argued in favor of the police being able to place GPS tracking devices on people’s cars without a warrant back in 2011. Fortunately, the Supreme Court ruled against it.

Naturally, the feds in the current case will discuss all of the criminals they were able to bring to justice as a result of these privacy violations, but they will certainly not point out America’s current epidemic of unlawful arrests, as well as arrests for petty non-violent crimes that happen each and every day. For instance, let’s not forget statistics that came out last fall from the FBI that showed police make an arrest every two seconds in the USA. I covered this in detail in my post: Land of the Free: American Police Make an Arrest Every 2 Seconds in 2012. Continue reading