Fort Hood opens debate about secrecy of medical records | TheHill

Camel’s nose under the tent alert:  Here we go.  This will be the meme of the coming years.  Your mental status has potential effects on the collective and so your privacy, your guns, your mind, your soul, your freedom and self-ownership are belong to us now.

Never mind that the discussion should be directed toward how a person should defend themselves against the aggression initiated by another.  Let’s instead talk about how ‘we’ prevent all aggression, at all times, in all places and at all costs to individual rights and sovereignty.  Lets instead discuss how we can all suffer for  the benefit of an amorphous ‘society’, instead of how we can empower ourselves as individuals to  protect ourselves.

I don’t know where to start with this tripe, so read it for yourself at TheHill.

Disgusted, Grey Enigma.

————————————————————————————————————————————

Army officials say one thing that could have helped prevent last week’s shooting at Fort Hood is better information sharing with commanders about the mental and behavioral health histories of incoming soldiers.

The shooter, Spc. Ivan Lopez, 34, had arrived at Fort Hood, Texas, in February after being stationed for four years at Fort Bliss, Texas. By the time of his transfer, Lopez had a history of mental health issues, including anxiety and depression, and was prescribed a number of prescription drugs, including Ambien.

But receiving commanders at Fort Hood would not have been privy to Lopez’s health history.

“Here’s the biggest problem we have. … It’s a dilemma,” said Army Chief of Staff Gen. Ray Odierno. “The problem is sharing information and how you protect an individual’s rights with sharing information, so the commanders and the people at the lower level understand that, maybe, there was a previous problem.”

Under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act HIPAA, a soldier’s mental and behavioral health record is kept private from his or her new commander. Thus, while physicians at a new base would have access to soldiers’ health records, a commander would not.“If a soldier has mental health counseling at Fort Bragg, N.C., and he moves to Fort Carson, Colo., sometimes we have difficulty moving that information with them, because of patient HIPAA….

go here for  the rest Fort Hood opens debate about secrecy of medical records | TheHill.

The Fort Hood Shooting vs. the Gun Control media | via YouViewed\Editorial

Well stated at YouViewed\Editorial blog (I have edited for emphasis):

When you look at recent mass shootings that have occurred recently there is one specific incident that is very rarely if ever mentioned by the liberal media and Gun Control advocates.

The Ft. Hood Shooting is never cited or discussed or even mentioned by the Anti’s and Gun grabbers like Bloomberg, Schumer, Boxer, Feinstein, McCarthy or Cuomo. They only cite the TucsonAurora and Sandy Hook events as reason to restrict law abiding citizens their rights. WHY?

One must make a few assumptions to uncover why they rarely if ever cite the Ft. Hood mass shooting in their quest to deny law abiding citizens their 2nd Amendment rights.

  1. …because it occurred on a military installation while Obama was the Commander in Chief;
  2. …because the perpetrator was Muslim and it is not politically correct because the President himself sympathizes with the Muslim plight across the world;
  3. …because the victims were military personnel and they just don’t have the same impact as civilians and children for good demagoguery.

Continue reading

NH gunowner, not shooter, may be liable | Concord Monitor

In a case attorneys say has no precedent in New Hampshire, a federal appeals court is weighing whether the owner of a handgun used to kill three people at a Conway military surplus shop in July 2007 could be held liable for their murders.

Lawrence Secord didn’t do enough to secure the .22-caliber handgun he kept at his camp in Wentworth Location, enabling his grandson, Michael Woodbury, to steal it and open fire in the Army Barracks store several days later, according to a lawsuit brought by the mother of one of the victims.

A federal judge decided Secord didn’t have a duty to store his gun in a different manner, citing the circumstances of the case – that Woodbury had broken into Secord’s cabin – and a New Hampshire Supreme Court ruling that individuals ordinarily can’t be held liable for crimes committed by others. Continue reading