In GPS case, US court debates ‘1984’ scenario | SpaceDaily

The US Supreme Court delved Tuesday into the issue of privacy amid 21st century technology, hearing arguments on whether police can use a GPS device attached to a vehicle to track a suspect without a search warrant…At issue is whether by attaching a GPS, or Global Positioning System tracking device without a warrant, police violated the man’s constitutional guarantee in the Fourth Amendment against unreasonable search and seizure…

Deputy Solicitor General Michael Dreeben told the nine justices on the top US court that the GPS device simply monitored the suspect’s location on public streets, which could be done by police visually without the need for a warrant.  The US government attorney said the GPS technology simply “can make police more efficient” and that “police efficiency has never been equated with an invasion of privacy.”

But comments from the justices were skeptical.  “If you win this case, there is nothing preventing you from monitoring the movements of every citizen of the United States 24 hours a day,” said Justice Stephen Breyer...

via In GPS case, US court debates ‘1984’ scenario.

Ohio Appeals Court Strikes Down GPS Vehicle Spying | the Newspaper.com

Ohio Appeals Court Strikes Down GPS Vehicle Spying. 9/30/2011.  –  “Although the US Supreme Court is expected to settle the issue of GPS tracking of motorists soon, a three-judge panel of the Ohio Court of Appeals, Fifth District ruled 2-1 earlier this month against the warrantless use of the technology. The majority’s decision was likely designed to influence the deliberations of the higher courts. On November 8, the US Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in the GPS case US v. Jones. The Ohio Supreme Court is also considering Ohio v. Johnson in which the Twelfth District appellate court upheld warrantless spying…” Go here …