Judge Rules No 5th Amendment Protections For Fingerprint-Protected Phones

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Court Rules Police Can Force Users To Unlock iPhones With Fingerprints, But Not Passcodes

” A Circuit Court judge in Virginia has ruled that fingerprints are not protected by the Fifth Amendment, a decision that has clear privacy implications for fingerprint-protected devices like newer iPhones and iPads.

  According to Judge Steven C. Fucci, while a criminal defendant can’t be compelled to hand over a passcode to police officers for the purpose of unlocking a cellular device, law enforcement officials can compel a defendant to give up a fingerprint.

  The Fifth Amendment states that “no person shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself,” which protects memorized information like passwords and passcodes, but it does not extend to fingerprints in the eyes of the law, as speculated by Wired last year. “

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The CBO Just Rendered Its Verdict On The Cost Of Obamacare, And It Isn’t Pretty | Forbes

The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) just rendered its latest opinion on the cost of Obamacare following the Supreme Court’s decision to uphold most of the law back in June.  The numbers aren’t pretty. Despite breathless media reports of additional “savings,” the government’s bean counters actually exposed several flaws in the law that will, in the long term, lead to higher costs and reduced access to insurance coverage. Continue reading

Virginia Appeals Court Expands Use of Roadblocks | Newspaper.com

Virginia Appeals Court Expands Use of Roadblocks.  Court of Appeals in Virginia gives police a free hand in setting up roadblocks to search motorists not suspected of any crime.

Police in Virginia may block off roads to search and interrogate motorists as long as a vague “plan” is filed in advance, the state Court of Appeals ruled last Tuesday. Michael Anthony Desposito challenged his May 27, 2009 arrest at a checkpoint run by the Hanover County Sheriff’s Office on the ground that the department allowed its officers to run open-ended roadblocks in violation of the Fourth Amendment. Continue reading