Fort Hood opens debate about secrecy of medical records | TheHill

Camel’s nose under the tent alert:  Here we go.  This will be the meme of the coming years.  Your mental status has potential effects on the collective and so your privacy, your guns, your mind, your soul, your freedom and self-ownership are belong to us now.

Never mind that the discussion should be directed toward how a person should defend themselves against the aggression initiated by another.  Let’s instead talk about how ‘we’ prevent all aggression, at all times, in all places and at all costs to individual rights and sovereignty.  Lets instead discuss how we can all suffer for  the benefit of an amorphous ‘society’, instead of how we can empower ourselves as individuals to  protect ourselves.

I don’t know where to start with this tripe, so read it for yourself at TheHill.

Disgusted, Grey Enigma.

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Army officials say one thing that could have helped prevent last week’s shooting at Fort Hood is better information sharing with commanders about the mental and behavioral health histories of incoming soldiers.

The shooter, Spc. Ivan Lopez, 34, had arrived at Fort Hood, Texas, in February after being stationed for four years at Fort Bliss, Texas. By the time of his transfer, Lopez had a history of mental health issues, including anxiety and depression, and was prescribed a number of prescription drugs, including Ambien.

But receiving commanders at Fort Hood would not have been privy to Lopez’s health history.

“Here’s the biggest problem we have. … It’s a dilemma,” said Army Chief of Staff Gen. Ray Odierno. “The problem is sharing information and how you protect an individual’s rights with sharing information, so the commanders and the people at the lower level understand that, maybe, there was a previous problem.”

Under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act HIPAA, a soldier’s mental and behavioral health record is kept private from his or her new commander. Thus, while physicians at a new base would have access to soldiers’ health records, a commander would not.“If a soldier has mental health counseling at Fort Bragg, N.C., and he moves to Fort Carson, Colo., sometimes we have difficulty moving that information with them, because of patient HIPAA….

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